Club Championships Rounds 1 and 2; Goswami leads, Gill and 3 others follow on 1.5

The Geelong Club Championships for 2020 kicked off on Thursday the 15th of October, with games being organised between players over the following week. The new format has worked smoothly so far; many thanks to Paul Brown for committing to the running of the tournament, and for volunteering to give weekly commentary on the games!

Sagar Goswami currently leads, having won both of his games; 4 players pursue him closely, including 2019 Victorian Country Champion Geoffrey Gill, who took a BYE in round 2, and 2019 Club Champion Reza Daneshvar! The next few rounds will undoubtedly see some bloodshed as the top contenders start to cross swords, and the shape of the leaderboard will truly emerge.

Round 1 Results:
Zoran Babic vs Geoffrey Gill 0-1
Reza Daneshvar vs Geoff Davis 1-0
Rodel Sicat vs Sagar Goswami 0-1
Mio Ristic vs Robert Dejanovic 1-0
Paul Brown vs Geoff Barber 0-1
Wade Patterson vs BYE 1-0
Jack Smith – half point BYE

Round 2 Results:
Geoff Barber vs Reza Daneshvar 1/2 – 1/2
Sagar Goswami vs Wade Patterson 1-0
Rob Dejanovic vs Zoran Babic 0-1
Jack Smith vs Mio Ristic 1-0
Geoff Davis vs Rodel Sicat 0-1
Paul Brown vs BYE 1-0
Geoffrey Gill – half point BYE

Round 3 Pairings to be produced 29 October.

Standings at end of round 2:
1. Sagar Goswami 2
2 – 5. Geoffrey Gill 1.5
Reza Daneshvar 1.5
Geoff Barber 1.5
Jack Smith 1.5
6 – 10. Zoran Babic 1
Mio Ristic 1
Rodel Sicat 1
Paul Brown 1
Wade Patterson 1
11 – 12. Geoff Davis 0
Robert Dejanovic 0


Round 1 report (Paul Brown):

Paul B vs Geoff B. 0:1
Paul and Geoff settled into a exchange slav defence for this game. Both players played well, however by the Bishop vs Knight ending Geoff had worn Pauls stamina and he blundered a knight fork, losing his bishop and consequently the game. https://www.chess.com/a/23aoUginS9tJa
Reza D vs Geoff D. 1:0
Reza and Geoff’s game featured an open Sicilian where Reza as white was able to attain some positional plusses that led to black resigning on move 25. https://www.chess.com/a/fkV1UwbL9tJa
Zoran B vs Geoffrey G. 0:1
Zoran played e4 and Geoffrey issued the somewhat rare schliemann/jaenisch gambit. Geoffrey showed his ability to play accurately and Zoran was overcome and resigned on move 40. https://www.chess.com/a/28jx7RQAJ9tJa
Mio R vs Rob D. 1:0
Rob played a pirc defence against e4 and Mio took the lions share of the centre in the opening. Mio opted to castle queenside on move 11 and both players began their attacks. White managed to crack blacks king position first, and in doing so opened Robs king up to a decisive barrage of checks. https://www.chess.com/a/3BZBaTmKt9tJa
Rodel S vs Sagar G. 0:1 As white in this game, Rodel played in an aggressive nature and put immediate pressure on blacks kingside. Sagar, not being one to buckle under pressure showed depth in his defence and did not allow Rodel any advantage. At the time of writing the analysis for this game may be incorrect, but I am hoping to correct it with feedback from the players. Here’s the game anyhow. https://www.chess.com/a/gc24dPgz9tJa


Round 2 report (Paul Brown)

Geoff D vs Rodel. 0 – 1.
Geoff and Rodel settled into a nice positional game with Geoff featuring his Colle system. Both players played well and the game remained even until the pieces were traded off; Geoff with a Bishop/Queen and Rodel with a Knight and queen. Rodel showed off his “magnus carlsen-esque” ability to make something out of nothing and managed to achieve positional dominance over the white pieces, leading to a victory for black. LINK: https://www.chess.com/…/a913bee2-181f-11eb-b942…
Rob D vs Zoran B. 0 – 1.
In this game we saw Rob opt for a Chigorin variation of the queens pawn opening, with Zoran opting for a Nf6, d5, Bf5 set up. Approaching the middle game Zoran allowed a black Knight to be traded on e4 and recapturing with the pawn, damaging his structure but controlling some nice squares in Robs territory. Rob, to counter this castled queenside and lined his rooks on the G and H files, with Zoran preferring to not castle at all! The rooks were traded and black managed to invade with the queen, leading to a tactic that lost white a piece. LINK: https://www.chess.com/…/9e94ca5e-181c-11eb-83e5…
Jack S vs Mio R. 1 – 0.
In this game opening with e4, we had the pleasure of seeing Mio’s dependable French defence. The players played an advanced Steinitz variation, with white featuring 3. Nc3 and an early f4 squeezed in before further development. Throughout the opening the players built a lot of pressure in the centre which was quickly liquified into an open position with neither king castled and each player still having two minor pieces, both rooks and their queens; the resulting position was extremely sharp and double edged. However, both players stepped up to the plate and played with high accuracy. In the end though it was Jack who was the most Grand-masterly and managed to snip an extra piece somewhere in the flurry of exchanges. Mio forced Jack to prove he could convert and used any and every resource or trap the position could offer – forcing Jack to remain razor sharp for the next 20 moves, with black still having winning chances all the way up until the end. LINK: https://www.chess.com/…/539be7be-181a-11eb-9d82…
Sagargiri G vs Wade P. 1 – 0.
Our last game to be analysed was an instructive showing by Sagar, showing us how an ultra-aggressive playstyle can really pay off. The players featured the classical variation of the Caro-Kann; with white taking full advantage of his slight lead in development over blacks un-castled king. Black was forced to go un-castled and retreat his dark square bishop back to it’s home square to defend against whites f5 knight post. This led to white being able to play dynamically to put pressure on black, and somewhere around move 20 blacks position crumbled to whites advanced pieces and superior rooks. LINK: https://www.chess.com/…/2549773c-181a-11eb-93d1…
Geoff B vs Reza D. 1/2 – 1/2.
Geoff and Reza’s game could not be scheduled this week and the players agreed to draw.

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